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urbpan:

retrogradeworks:

nesft:

Crow: CROW YES!

You can feel the offense on that golden eagle’s face.

I love corvids so much. “Being a jerk” as a biological adaptation.

(Source: yinqors, via asakiyume)

In England, as in Japan, vending machines are usu. temperature controlled. My experience here in the US is, even if the machine IS stocked and working that week, you don’t run down to the machine during coffee break unless you want a gooey mess (May through October).

charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos

(via asakiyume)

kritseldis:

A postcard showing a colour board from 1895 Encyclopedia. The berries marked as 10.-14. are gooseberries.
I learned surfing the net that “the Gooseberry was enormously fashionable in Victorian England (& is remarkably easy to grow here), & all over the northern half of the country (from the midlands upwards) Gooseberry Societies became popular & fiercely competitive. They were dedicated to the cultivation & breeding of new & improved varieties of the humble goozgog! Although in more modern times this old-fashioned fruit has lost favour & many of these societies no longer exist, there is a resurgence of interest & those societies still in existence are gaining again in membership & popularity.” Don’t you love the knowledgeable people one has the possibility to read on the Internet ?!
The summer seems to have agreed with gooseberries, there is a good harvest of them. Wondering should I just think “This, too, will pass!” and ignore the berries, or should there be some gooseberry chutney?
My late aunt used to have a German shepherd dog, who ate gooseberries from the bush, not minding the thorns. We only saw him doing so when we were also eating the gooseberries, so we never figured out did the dog actually like the berries or was he eating just for the pleasure of the company?
Also, this is a good moment to listen the adult cover of the song about wicked gooseberry again!

kritseldis:

A postcard showing a colour board from 1895 Encyclopedia. The berries marked as 10.-14. are gooseberries.

I learned surfing the net that “the Gooseberry was enormously fashionable in Victorian England (& is remarkably easy to grow here), & all over the northern half of the country (from the midlands upwards) Gooseberry Societies became popular & fiercely competitive. They were dedicated to the cultivation & breeding of new & improved varieties of the humble goozgog! Although in more modern times this old-fashioned fruit has lost favour & many of these societies no longer exist, there is a resurgence of interest & those societies still in existence are gaining again in membership & popularity.” Don’t you love the knowledgeable people one has the possibility to read on the Internet ?!

The summer seems to have agreed with gooseberries, there is a good harvest of them. Wondering should I just think “This, too, will pass!” and ignore the berries, or should there be some gooseberry chutney?

My late aunt used to have a German shepherd dog, who ate gooseberries from the bush, not minding the thorns. We only saw him doing so when we were also eating the gooseberries, so we never figured out did the dog actually like the berries or was he eating just for the pleasure of the company?

Also, this is a good moment to listen the adult cover of the song about wicked gooseberry again!

(via asakiyume)

downsideabbeylibrary:

Victorian Advertising in the Archive


This rather splendid advertisement for ‘Goddard’s Plate Powder and Furniture Cream’ was found slipped into the diary of Dom Alphonsus Morrall (1825-1911) for the year 1896. Dom Alphonsus is perhaps best known as the builder of St Benedict’s Church at Stratton-on-the-Fosse. The Archive at Downside contains a long run of his diaries which contain many inclusions like this one. Apart from its obvious monastic ‘interest’ (depicting monastics, even if in cartoon form) Dom Alphonse not only saved the advertisement but added a short inscription immediately after the central scroll (‘Plate Powder and’), noting: ‘There is a House of Dominicans at Leicester – the Habit and perhaps even the features may have been taken there’. Goddard’s was founded in Leicester in the 1830’s by Joseph Goddard, a chemist. Downside doubtless used large quantities of Goddard’s powder and cream in the late nineteenth century to clean its liturgical vessels, domestic silver and furniture.

(Source: six3seven, via roaringbikes)

urbpan:

retrogradeworks:

nesft:

Crow: CROW YES!

You can feel the offense on that golden eagle’s face.

I love corvids so much. “Being a jerk” as a biological adaptation.

(Source: yinqors, via asakiyume)

In England, as in Japan, vending machines are usu. temperature controlled. My experience here in the US is, even if the machine IS stocked and working that week, you don’t run down to the machine during coffee break unless you want a gooey mess (May through October).

charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos

(via asakiyume)

kritseldis:

A postcard showing a colour board from 1895 Encyclopedia. The berries marked as 10.-14. are gooseberries.
I learned surfing the net that “the Gooseberry was enormously fashionable in Victorian England (& is remarkably easy to grow here), & all over the northern half of the country (from the midlands upwards) Gooseberry Societies became popular & fiercely competitive. They were dedicated to the cultivation & breeding of new & improved varieties of the humble goozgog! Although in more modern times this old-fashioned fruit has lost favour & many of these societies no longer exist, there is a resurgence of interest & those societies still in existence are gaining again in membership & popularity.” Don’t you love the knowledgeable people one has the possibility to read on the Internet ?!
The summer seems to have agreed with gooseberries, there is a good harvest of them. Wondering should I just think “This, too, will pass!” and ignore the berries, or should there be some gooseberry chutney?
My late aunt used to have a German shepherd dog, who ate gooseberries from the bush, not minding the thorns. We only saw him doing so when we were also eating the gooseberries, so we never figured out did the dog actually like the berries or was he eating just for the pleasure of the company?
Also, this is a good moment to listen the adult cover of the song about wicked gooseberry again!

kritseldis:

A postcard showing a colour board from 1895 Encyclopedia. The berries marked as 10.-14. are gooseberries.

I learned surfing the net that “the Gooseberry was enormously fashionable in Victorian England (& is remarkably easy to grow here), & all over the northern half of the country (from the midlands upwards) Gooseberry Societies became popular & fiercely competitive. They were dedicated to the cultivation & breeding of new & improved varieties of the humble goozgog! Although in more modern times this old-fashioned fruit has lost favour & many of these societies no longer exist, there is a resurgence of interest & those societies still in existence are gaining again in membership & popularity.” Don’t you love the knowledgeable people one has the possibility to read on the Internet ?!

The summer seems to have agreed with gooseberries, there is a good harvest of them. Wondering should I just think “This, too, will pass!” and ignore the berries, or should there be some gooseberry chutney?

My late aunt used to have a German shepherd dog, who ate gooseberries from the bush, not minding the thorns. We only saw him doing so when we were also eating the gooseberries, so we never figured out did the dog actually like the berries or was he eating just for the pleasure of the company?

Also, this is a good moment to listen the adult cover of the song about wicked gooseberry again!

(via asakiyume)

(Source: mokzo)

(Source: mokzo)

downsideabbeylibrary:

Victorian Advertising in the Archive


This rather splendid advertisement for ‘Goddard’s Plate Powder and Furniture Cream’ was found slipped into the diary of Dom Alphonsus Morrall (1825-1911) for the year 1896. Dom Alphonsus is perhaps best known as the builder of St Benedict’s Church at Stratton-on-the-Fosse. The Archive at Downside contains a long run of his diaries which contain many inclusions like this one. Apart from its obvious monastic ‘interest’ (depicting monastics, even if in cartoon form) Dom Alphonse not only saved the advertisement but added a short inscription immediately after the central scroll (‘Plate Powder and’), noting: ‘There is a House of Dominicans at Leicester – the Habit and perhaps even the features may have been taken there’. Goddard’s was founded in Leicester in the 1830’s by Joseph Goddard, a chemist. Downside doubtless used large quantities of Goddard’s powder and cream in the late nineteenth century to clean its liturgical vessels, domestic silver and furniture.

(Source: taka-sick, via roaringbikes)

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