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downsideabbeylibrary:

St Swithun’s Day


Winchester’s most famous saint, little is known of St Swithun’s life. Swithun (also Swithhun, Swithin) was born in Wessex, educated in Winchester and became bishop in 852. During his ten years in office, he was renowned for his charitable gifts and church building. He died circa 863 and was buried in Winchester Old Minster. St Swithun’s cult rose to prominence with the translation of his body by St Aethelwold in 971, from an outdoor tomb into a sumptuous indoor shrine. St Swithun appears in many late Anglo-Saxon litanies and generated a considerable literature during the tenth and eleventh centuries, his fame even spreading as far as Scandinavia. Translated to the new Norman cathedral in 1093, St Swithun’s shrine became a popular pilgrimage destination throughout the Middle Ages, over-seen by the Benedictine monks of the cathedral-priory named in the saint’s honour. There are fifty-eight ancient dedications to St Swithun in England and a few in Scandinavia. Remarkably, the saint’s head appears to have survived the Reformation by fortuitously being enshrined at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Évreux in Normandy, northern France.


The first image above is a late nineteenth-century ink and watercolour tracing of St Swithun, taken from the tenth-century Benedictional of St Aethelwold which can today be seen in the British Library. For the complete digitized version of the manuscript, see: http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=add_ms_49598 . One of a number of fine sketches contained in a portfolio, in is uncertain which of Downside’s monks was responsible for this detailed drawing. The second image is taken from a late nineteenth-century stereoscopic card. Meant to be viewed through a stereoscope, when the two images are combined the resulting scene appears to the viewer in three dimensions. There are a number of these stereoscopic cards in the Abbey Archive. This card depicts the chantry chapel of Bishop Fox in the retrochoir of Winchester Cathedral. Fox built his chapel hard by the shrine of St Swithun (to the right of the chantry chapel – not shown in this image) so that he could be buried in close proximity to the saint. Although St Swithun’s original shrine was destroyed when the Benedictine cathedral-priory of Winchester was dissolved at the Reformation, a new memorial has been erected on the site in recent years and St Swithun is once again honoured in his cathedral church.


St Swithun’s Day (15 July), is perhaps best known for its place in British folklore. According to tradition, if it rains on the feast of St Swithun, it will rain for the next 40 days:


St Swithun’s day if thou dost rain
For forty days it will remain
St Swithun’s day if thou be fair
For forty days ‘twill rain nae mare

asakiyume:

Behold the Burry Man of Queensferry, Scotland! He wears a suit of burdock burrs and makes the circuit of the town on the second Friday in August, receiving tipples along the way. More info here.

(Source: ferryfair.co.uk)

sapporosanporo:

八紘学園のソフトクリーム

sapporosanporo:

狸小路のお祭があるようですね

sapporosanporo:

狸小路のお祭があるようですね

sapporosanporo:

気は長く
腹は立てず
心は丸く
己は下に
人は上に

sapporosanporo:

は長く

は立てず

は丸く

は下に

は上に

sapporodailies:

sighted at Odori Park june 30th — another person going around Japan on a ママチャリ

downsideabbeylibrary:

St Swithun’s Day


Winchester’s most famous saint, little is known of St Swithun’s life. Swithun (also Swithhun, Swithin) was born in Wessex, educated in Winchester and became bishop in 852. During his ten years in office, he was renowned for his charitable gifts and church building. He died circa 863 and was buried in Winchester Old Minster. St Swithun’s cult rose to prominence with the translation of his body by St Aethelwold in 971, from an outdoor tomb into a sumptuous indoor shrine. St Swithun appears in many late Anglo-Saxon litanies and generated a considerable literature during the tenth and eleventh centuries, his fame even spreading as far as Scandinavia. Translated to the new Norman cathedral in 1093, St Swithun’s shrine became a popular pilgrimage destination throughout the Middle Ages, over-seen by the Benedictine monks of the cathedral-priory named in the saint’s honour. There are fifty-eight ancient dedications to St Swithun in England and a few in Scandinavia. Remarkably, the saint’s head appears to have survived the Reformation by fortuitously being enshrined at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Évreux in Normandy, northern France.


The first image above is a late nineteenth-century ink and watercolour tracing of St Swithun, taken from the tenth-century Benedictional of St Aethelwold which can today be seen in the British Library. For the complete digitized version of the manuscript, see: http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=add_ms_49598 . One of a number of fine sketches contained in a portfolio, in is uncertain which of Downside’s monks was responsible for this detailed drawing. The second image is taken from a late nineteenth-century stereoscopic card. Meant to be viewed through a stereoscope, when the two images are combined the resulting scene appears to the viewer in three dimensions. There are a number of these stereoscopic cards in the Abbey Archive. This card depicts the chantry chapel of Bishop Fox in the retrochoir of Winchester Cathedral. Fox built his chapel hard by the shrine of St Swithun (to the right of the chantry chapel – not shown in this image) so that he could be buried in close proximity to the saint. Although St Swithun’s original shrine was destroyed when the Benedictine cathedral-priory of Winchester was dissolved at the Reformation, a new memorial has been erected on the site in recent years and St Swithun is once again honoured in his cathedral church.


St Swithun’s Day (15 July), is perhaps best known for its place in British folklore. According to tradition, if it rains on the feast of St Swithun, it will rain for the next 40 days:


St Swithun’s day if thou dost rain
For forty days it will remain
St Swithun’s day if thou be fair
For forty days ‘twill rain nae mare

asakiyume:

Behold the Burry Man of Queensferry, Scotland! He wears a suit of burdock burrs and makes the circuit of the town on the second Friday in August, receiving tipples along the way. More info here.

(Source: ferryfair.co.uk)

sapporosanporo:

花菖蒲

sapporosanporo:

八紘学園のソフトクリーム

sapporosanporo:

のるべさ

sapporosanporo:

のるべさ

sapporosanporo:

狸小路のお祭があるようですね

sapporosanporo:

狸小路のお祭があるようですね

sapporosanporo:

気は長く
腹は立てず
心は丸く
己は下に
人は上に

sapporosanporo:

は長く

は立てず

は丸く

は下に

は上に

sapporosanporo:

夜の市電

sapporosanporo:

夜の市電

sapporodailies:

sighted at Odori Park june 30th — another person going around Japan on a ママチャリ

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